Posts Tagged: Fine Gardening

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Hidcote

This is the fourth installment of multiple reports from the week-long educational trip some of our team members took in the summer of 2022. I remember the feeling of absolute joy and excitement when my parents took me to Walt Disney World when I was a young kid; around every bend was a different ride, a life-size character, and a thousand other kids who were as stoked...

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Kew Gardens

This is the first installment of multiple reports from the week-long educational trip some of our team members took in the summer of 2022. Landed, arrived, rested. We arrived in London on Friday June 30th on a red eye flight from Dulles, dumped our bags, caught a breakfast, and went to the Chelsea Physics Garden located next to the Thames.  It was a smaller garden...

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Boxwood Blight – A Public Service Announcement

The Perfect Storm for Boxwood Blight   Temperatures are creating the perfect conditions for boxwood blight!  Find out what you can do to protect your landscape. Perfect Conditions for Blight Boxwood blight thrives during periods of high humidity and moisture. We are currently experiencing high humidity after a lot of rain; this has created the...

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Water Restrictions Update

Happy Fall!   We wanted to let everyone know that with the new mandatory water restrictions being implemented by the Albemarle County Service Authority and the City of Charlottesville, we can still water our plants!   For those living in Albemarle County, see statement below:   Plants may only be watered using a watering can or by a...

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Horticultural Trivia

What tree or shrub is virtually extinct?  It has not been seen in the wild since 1790. Answer: Franklinia alatamaha.  Apparently, this tree was discovered on the bank of the Altamaha River in Georgia in 1770 by John Bartram who collected a few for his garden, but this plant has not been seen in the wild since 1790.  According to Michael Dirr, the tree guru mentioned...

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A plant for all seasons…

Whether as part of a hedge on a historic estate or as a specimen shrub at the entrance of an architecturally modern home, the flowering quince is one of the more versatile plants in the landscape. Best recognized as a harbinger of spring, Chaenomoles speciosa spends most of the year as a shrubby tangle of branches with non-descriptive foliage while providing a haven...

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